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Iceland

14 days in Iceland
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Nave Algarici

20th August 2019
Around Iceland in 12 days.
Room With A View - Apartments
Krýsuvík
The geothermal area Krýsuvík is situated on the Reykjanes peninsula in Iceland. It is in the south of Reykjanes in the middle of the fissure zone on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge which traverses Iceland. Krýsuvík consists of several geothermal fields, such as Seltún. Here solfataras, fumaroles, mud pots and hot springs have formed, the soil is coloured bright yellow, red, and green hues. Sulphur deposits were mined in 1722 - 1728 and in the 19th century. German scientist Robert Bunsen visited the site in 1845 and, based on research there, proposed a hypothesis on formation of sulphuric acid in nature.Near the geothermal fields are several maars - craters created by the explosions of overheated groundwater. The unusual green-blue Grænavatn lake has formed in one of these maars. Test boreholes were made here in the early 1970s, some of the boreholes have turned into irregular, artificial geysers, one of which exploded in 1999, leaving a crater.Krýsuvík is a popular hiking area and tourism infrastructure - such as wooden pathways - has been developed. The biggest lake in the area, Kleifarvatn, began to diminish after a big earthquake in 2000; 20% of its surface has since disappeared. In this area there were some farms until the 19th century, after which they were abandoned. Only a small chapel, Krísuvíkurkirkja, built in 1857, remained, until it burned to the ground on January 2, 2010. The music video for the song "Never Forget" by Greta Salóme & Jónsi was filmed in this area. This song also went to the Eurovision Song Contest 2012 in Baku, Azerbaijan and came 20th in the grand final.
Reykjanes Lighthouse
The first lighthouse in Iceland was built on Valahnúkur in Reykjanes in the year 1878. By 1905 earthquakes and surf had damaged Valahnúkur so much that there was the risk of the lighthouse falling into the sea. A new lighthouse was therefore built in 1907-1908 on Bæjarfell hill in Reykjanes and the old one was demolished with an explosion on april 16th 1908. A survey which Rögnvaldur Guðmundsson supervised in 2007 for the Icelandic Maritime Administration led to the conclusion that Reykjanes lighthouse was the most popular lighthouse among Icelanders. The lightsignal height is 69 meters above sealevel but the actual height of the lighthouse is 26 metres. Reykjanes lighthouse also has a radio beacon with a correction signal. There is carved rock and concrete in the lighthouse. Architect Frederik Kjørboe and engineer Thorvald Krabbe designed the lighthouse. The operation of Reykjanes Lighthouse is under the supervision of the Icelandic Maritime Administration.
Bridge America - Europe
Bridge between Europe and North America on Reykjanes Peninsula. The lava-scarred Reykjanes peninsula lies on one of the world's major plate boundaries, the Mid Atlantic Ridge. According to the continental drift theory the Eurasian and North American tectonic plates are continuously drifting apart with great forces under the gaping rifts. As the plates diverge, linear fractures, known as fissures form due to stresses created by the tension that builds up as the plates move away from each other. The Bridge between two continents at Sandvík is a small footbridge over a major fissure which provides clear evidence of the presence of a diverging plate margin. The bridge was built as a symbol for the connection between Europe and North America. One can cross the continental divide on Leif the Lucky's Bridge and take home a personalised certificate at the Reykjanes information center and Reykjanes Geopark visitor center at Duus Cultural house.
Hafnarberg - Sea-cliffs
Hafnaberg is a long line of sheer sea lava cliffs south of the old fishing hamlet of Hafnir. Hafnaberg is very popular among hikers and bird watchers as various marine birds nest at the cliffs. A parkingplace is located 4 km from Hafnir on road 44 and from there is a marked path from the road to the cliffs. Hafnaberg is a geosite in Reykjanes Unesco Global Geopark.
Blue Lagoon
The Blue Lagoon is a geothermal spa located in a lava field near Grindavík on the Reykjanes Peninsula, southwestern Iceland. It’s one of the most popular attractions in Iceland, also known all over the world. The Blue Lagoon is a 15-minute drive from Keflavík International Airport or a 30-minute drive from Reykjavík.
Grótta
Íþróttafélagið Grótta (English: Grótta Sports Club) is an Icelandic sports club based in the town of Seltjarnarnes, in the Capital Region. The club is best known for its women's handball team that won the national championship in 2015 and 2016, but also has departments for gymnastics, football and power lifting.
Austurvöllur
Austurvöllur is a public square in Reykjavík, Iceland. The square is a popular gathering place for the citizens of Reykjavík, and especially during good weather due to the prevalence of cafés on Vallarstræti and Pósthússtræti. It has also been a focal point of protests due to the close location to the Parliament of Iceland. The square contains a large statue of Jón Sigurðsson, a leader of Iceland's independence movement. Austurvöllur is surrounded by Vallarstræti, Pósthússtræti, Kirkjustræti and Thorvaldsensstræti. The latter of which is named after Bertel Thorvaldsen, a statue of whom was, for a long period of time, present in the centre of Austurvöllur, now occupied by a statue of Jón Sigurðsson. Located around the perimeter of the square are: the Alþingishúsið (Parliament House), the Dómkirkjan (the city's oldest church), the Hotel Borg, as well as numerous cafés, restaurants and bars. In the early 18th century, Austurvöllur was much larger and stretched from Aðalstræti in the west towards the creek in the east, and Aðalstræti in the north towards Tjörn in the south.
Tjörnin
Tjörnin (Icelandic pronunciation: ​[ˈtʰjœ(r)tnɪn], The Pond) is a small, prominent lake in central Reykjavík, the capital of Iceland. Most visitors to the city pass along its shore, as it is situated in the city centre next to the Reykjavik City Hall and several museums. Tjörnin means "the lake" or "the pond". The popular pastime of feeding the birds on the lake shore has led to the lake being called "the biggest bread soup in the world" (stærsta brauðsúpa í heimi).
Reykjavík City Hall
Ráðhús Reykjavíkur (English: Reykjavík's City Hall) is situated by the Tjörnin (City Pond) in Reykjavík. It houses the offices of the mayor of Reykjavík and a large 3D map of Iceland. The city hall is sometimes used for art exhibitions, functions or live music performances. The building was constructed in 1992 following an international competition won by architects Studio Granda.
Hallgrimskirkja
Hallgrímskirkja (Icelandic pronunciation: ​[ˈhatl̥krimsˌcʰɪr̥ca], church of Hallgrímur) is a Lutheran (Church of Iceland) parish church in Reykjavík, Iceland. At 74.5 metres (244 ft) high, it is the largest church in Iceland and among the tallest structures in the country. The church is named after the Icelandic poet and clergyman Hallgrímur Pétursson (1614–1674), author of the Passion Hymns.
Harpa Concert Hall and Conference Centre
Sun Voyager
The Sun Voyager (Icelandic: Sólfar) is a sculpture by Jón Gunnar Árnason, located next to the Sæbraut road in Reykjavík, Iceland. Sun Voyager is described as a dreamboat, or an ode to the Sun. The artist intended it to convey the promise of undiscovered territory, a dream of hope, progress and freedom.
Hveragerði
Hveragerði is a town in South Iceland. Hveragerði [http://en.south.is/TravelGuide/PracticalInformation/ViewService/hveragerdi-regional-information-center with business hours 8:30-17:00 on weekdays, 9:00-14:00 on Saturdays and 9:00-13:00 on Sundays between June 1 and August 31. In low season it is open on weekdays 8:30-16:00 and Saturdays 9:00-13:00, and closed on Sundays.
Urriðafoss
Urriðafoss is a waterfall located in the river Þjórsá in southwest Iceland. The Fossafélagið Títan company was given permission in 1927 to build a power plant in Urriðafoss in connection with a railway to Reykjavík from the waterfall. It did not happen but now Landsvirkjun is planning to build hydropower stations on the lower part of Þjórsár river, at Urriðafoss and Núpur. The proposed Urriðafoss Power Plant is expected to have a capacity of approximately 125 MW and a power-generating capacity of 930 GWh per year. The powerhouse will be underground and a tunnel leading from the powerhouse will open out into Þjórsá river below Urriðafoss waterfall. The waterfall is expected to disappear if the powerhouse is built. Local residents in the area are protesting against the construction in an effort to save Urriðafoss.
Seljalandsfoss
Seljalandsfoss is a waterfall in Iceland. Seljalandsfoss is located in the South Region in Iceland right by Route 1 and the road that leads to Þórsmörk Road 249. The waterfall drops 60 m (197 ft) and is part of the Seljalands River that has its origin in the volcano glacier Eyjafjallajökull. Visitors can walk behind the falls into a small cave.
Dyrhólaey
Dyrhólaey (Icelandic for door hill island), formerly known by seamen as Cape Portland, is a small promonotory located on the south coast of Iceland, not far from the village Vík. It was formerly an island of volcanic origin, which is also known by the Icelandic word eyja meaning island. The peninsula has an elevation of 120 metres (390 ft), and the Dyrhólaey Lighthouse sits at the top of the formation facing the sea.The view from Dyrhólaey is broad: To the north is to be seen the big glacier Mýrdalsjökull. To the east, the black lava columns of the Reynisdrangar come out of the sea, and to the west the whole coastline in the direction of Selfoss is visible – depending on weather conditions. In front of the peninsula, there is a gigantic black arch of lava standing in the sea, which gave the peninsula its name (meaning: door hill island).In the summertime, many Atlantic puffins can be found nesting on the cliff faces of Dyrhólaey.
Hotel Rangá
Hekla Center
Landmannalaugar
Landmannalaugar is in South Iceland. A remote encampment consisting of a campsite, and accommodation hut as well as basic amenity huts including an excellent shower block and a small shop. The camp is surrounded by mountains and is backed by a massive rhyolite (volcanic rock) cliff which shelters it (although it is still very exposed - take heed of the piles of rocks for anchoring tents that are kept in large wooden boxes or "rock corrals"). Many volcanic phenomena can be seen in the area. Landmannalaugar is part of the Fjallabak Nature Reserve. There are hot springs to dip in after the walk.
Eldgjá
Eldgjá (Icelandic pronunciation: [ˈɛltcau] (listen), "fire canyon") is a volcano and a canyon in Iceland. Eldgjá and the Katla volcano are part of the same volcanic system in the south of the country. Situated between Landmannalaugar and Kirkjubæjarklaustur, Eldgjá is the largest volcanic canyon in the world, approx. 40 km long, 270 m deep and 600 m wide at its greatest.
Hrifunes Nature Park
Fjaðrárgljúfur Canyon
Fjaðrárgljúfur (pronounced [ˈfjaːðraurˌkljuːvʏr̥]) is a canyon in south east Iceland. The Fjaðrá river flows through it. The canyon has steep walls and winding water. It is up to 100 m (330 ft) deep and about 2 kilometres (1.2 miles) long. It is located near the Ring Road, not far from the village of Kirkjubæjarklaustur.Its origins dates back to the cold periods of the Ice Age, about two million years ago. The canyon was created by progressive erosion by flowing water from glaciers through the rocks and palagonite over millennia. A waterfall flows down the western side of the canyon, visible from an observation platform at the end of a one-mile hike up the eastern edge.In May 2019, authorities closed the canyon to visitors after it appeared in a music video by Justin Bieber. The resulting stream of visitors threatened to damage the canyon's environment.
Fagrifoss
Fagrifoss is waterfall situated in Southeast Iceland near the Lakagígar region. It is located along the 4x4 road F206 approximately 24 km (15 mi) from Kirkjubæjarklaustur and 40 km (25 mi) from Laki. Access to the waterfall requires the crossing of a river ford, for which a 4x4 vehicle is needed.
Laki
Laki or Lakagígar (Craters of Laki) is a volcanic fissure in the south of Iceland, not far from the volcanic fissure of Eldgjá and the small village of Kirkjubæjarklaustur. The fissure is properly referred to as Lakagígar, while Laki is a mountain that the fissure bisects. Lakagígar is part of a volcanic system centered on the volcano Grímsvötn and including the volcano Thordarhyrna. It lies between the glaciers of Mýrdalsjökull and Vatnajökull, in an area of fissures that run in a southwest to northeast direction. The system erupted violently over an eight-month period between June 1783 and February 1784 from the Laki fissure and the adjoining volcano Grímsvötn, pouring out an estimated 42 billion tons or 14 km3 (3.4 cu mi) of basalt lava and clouds of poisonous hydrofluoric acid and sulfur dioxide compounds that contaminated the soil, leading to the death of over 50% of Iceland's livestock population, and the destruction of the vast majority of all crops. This led to a famine which then killed approximately 25% of the island's human population. The lava flows also destroyed 20 villages. The Laki eruption and its aftermath caused a drop in global temperatures, as 120 million tons of sulfur dioxide was spewed into the Northern Hemisphere. This caused crop failures in Europe and may have caused droughts in North Africa and India.
Skaftafell
Skaftafell (listen ) is a preservation area in Öræfi, southeast Iceland. It was once a major farm, later being named a national park. Originally known as Skaftafell National Park, it was subsequently joined together with other nearby regions to form the larger Vatnajökull National Park. Black waterfall - svartifoss (do not miss!)
Fjallsárlón
Fjallsárlón is a glacier lake at the south end of the Icelandic glacier Vatnajökull. Fjallsjökull which is part of the bigger glacier reaches down to the water of the lake and some ice-bergs are drifting by on its surface. The glacier calving into the lagoon is a part of Vatnajökull National Park and the better known glacier lake Jökulsárlón is not far from there. From the glacier lake Breiðárlón a little river flows into the Fjallsárlón. Above, there is looming the famous volcano Öræfajökull. At its shore, in the summertime, it is better to beware of the skúas, big seagulls which have their nests on the ground around the lake.
Jökulsárlón
Jökulsárlón is in southeast Iceland. Jökulsárlón literally means glacier lagoon (Jökull - glacier, lón - lagoon). At the time when first settlers arrived in Iceland, the edge of Breiðamerkurjökull, an outlet glacier of the great glacier Vatnajökull, is thought to have been 20km further north than it is now. The climate began to cool in about the year 1200, the cold spell reaching a peak in the period 1600-1900, which is sometimes known as the "Little Ice Age". As a result the glacier advanced until about 1890, reaching a point only about 1km from the coast at Jökulsá river. The eastern part of the glacier eroded the sediments of Breiðamerkursandur to a depth of up to 300m below sea level, the sediment being carried forward by the river Jökulsá. Without the river the glacier could not have eroded such a deep basin, because it is the river that carries the sediment to the sea.The warm period from 1920 to 1965 caused great changes in Breiðamerkurjökull glacier. It retreated very quickly, leaving a lagoon up to 190m deep where the glacier snout had been, and several kilometers of glacial moraines were exposed on both sides of the lagoon. The lagoon grew from 8km² in 1975 to 15km² in 1998. Large blocks of ice break off the edge of the glacier, which is about 30m high, keeping the lagoon stocked with icebergs.The lagoon, when frozen, was used in the 2002 James Bond film, Die Another Day, for a BMW chase scene.
Höfn
Höfn (pronounced something like "herpn", also known as Höfn í Hornafirði, is a town in East Iceland, at the south-eastern corner of the country. Höfn sits by the lagoon (or fjord) Hornafjörður which is also the name of the large municipality of which the town is the centre and which covers the entire area of the county Austur-Skaftafellssýsla. This guide covers the town and the surrounding municipality, excluding the westernmost part which forms one of the main gateways to Vatnajökull National Park. For tourism purposes, the area calls itself the Vatnajökull Region: nowhere else is quite as dominated by Europe's largest glacier, nowhere else have people learned to live in such close quarters with the huge sheet of ice. In spite of substantial territory, the population of the Hornafjörður area is only around 2400. Höfn is by far the largest settlement with around 2000 inhabitants. The rest of the population is spread along the very narrow patch of arable land between Vatnajökull and the Atlantic Ocean. Höfn's economical activities mainly revolve around fisheries, and the town is especially known for lobster which can be found in abundant quantities in the fishing areas surrounding the southeastern coast.Despite its name which indicates a fjord, Hornafjörður is a very large lagoon with a blend of fresh and glacial water. The 40 square km lagoon is formed by interactions of the Atlantic Ocean and the Vatnajökull glacier, which by its constant movement produces clay and sand, carried by the glacier rivers and ending up as sediment in the lagoon. The lagoon is shallow, but nevertheless navigable by large ships and the town of Höfn (the name means harbour) is located at the first natural harbour on the south coast after Þorlákshöfn hundreds of kilometers to the west.The area is dominated by large mountains, wide rivers, and the ever-present Vatnajökull glacier. All of this has combined to make the area one of the most remote in Iceland until the last few decades of the 20th century when roads were significantly improved.
Humarhöfnin Veitingahús
Vestrahorn Mountain
Álftafjörður
White Swans nesting area
Djúpivogur
Djúpivogur is a small town and municipality (Djúpavogshreppur) located on a peninsula in the Austurland in eastern Iceland, near the island of Papey and on the fjord Berufjörður. The municipality was formed by the merger of rural communities Berunes, Buland, and Geithellur on October 1, 1992. The coastline consists of three fjords Berufjörður, Hamarsfjörður, and Álftafjörður. The town of Djúpivogur is located on a peninsula between Berufjörður and Hamarsfjörður. Approximately 900 m west of the town is a work of art named "Eggin í Gleðivík" (The Eggs of Merry Bay) by Sigurður Guðmundsson. The work is a replica of the eggs of 34 nesting birds in the area, and was installed in the summer of 2009.
Stöðvarfjörður
Stöðvarfjörður (formerly Kirkjuból) is a village in east Iceland. It sits on the Northern shore of the fjord of the same name, is part of the municipality of Fjarðabyggð and has less than 200 inhabitants.
Fáskrúðsfjörður
Fáskrúðsfjörður (previously named also Búðir) is a village (þorp) in eastern Iceland. It has a population of 662 (as of 2011) and constitutes one of the villages composing the municipality of Fjarðabyggð.
Reyðarfjörður
Reyðarfjörður is a town in Iceland. It has a population of 1,102 and is one of the most populated villages that constitute the municipality of Fjarðabyggð.
Hallormsstadhaskogur
Hengifoss
Hengifoss is the third highest waterfall in Iceland, 128 meters. It is located in Hengifossá in Fljótsdalshreppur, East Iceland. It is surrounded by basaltic strata with thin, red layers of clay between the basaltic layers. Fossilized trunks of coniferous trees, sensitive to cold, and lignite, which depict warmer climates during the latter part of Tertiary. Further down the Hengifossá river is Litlanesfoss, notable for the columnar jointed volcanics around it. Hengifoss is the most popular hiking site in East Iceland with path leading from the parking lot to the falls. It takes 40-60 minutes to walk to the waterfall.
Lagarfljót
Lagarfljót (also called Lögurinn) is a lake situated in the east of Iceland near Egilsstaðir. Its surface measures 53 square kilometres (20 sq mi) and it is 25 kilometres (16 mi) long; its greatest width is 2.5 km (1.6 mi) and its greatest depth 112 m (367 ft). The River Lagarfljót flows through this lake. The 27 MW Lagarfossvirkjun hydropower station is located at its lower end.The biggest forest in Iceland, Hallormsstaðaskógur is found near the lake as well as a waterfall, Hengifoss. Hengifoss, at 118 m (387 ft), is one of the tallest waterfalls in the country. Below it is another waterfall called Litlanesfoss. As with the Scottish lake Loch Ness, a cryptid serpent, called Lagarfljótsormurinn by locals, is believed by some to live in the depths of Lagarfljót.
Seydisfjordur
Seyðisfjörður is a town and municipality in the Eastern Region of Iceland at the innermost point of the fjord of the same name. A road over Fjarðarheiði mountain pass connects Seyðisfjörður to the rest of Iceland; 27 kilometres (17 miles) to the ring road and Egilsstaðir. Seyðisfjörður is surrounded by mountains with the most prominent Mt. Bjólfur to the west (1085m) and Strandartindur (1010m) to the east. The fjord itself is accessible on each side from the town, by following the main road that leads through the town. Further out the fjord is fairly remote but rich with natural interests including puffin colonies and ruins of former activity such as nearby Vestdalseyri, from where the local church was transported.
Icelandair Hotel Herad
Dettifoss
Vatnajökull National Park in Iceland is the largest national park in Europe. The park was founded on 7 June 2008 and includes the former Skaftafell and Jökulsárgljúfur National Parks. Containing 12,000 km2 the park covers about 12% of the surface of Iceland. The park is home to Iceland's highest mountain (Hvannadalshnúkur), largest glacier (Vatnajökull), and Europe's most powerful waterfall (Dettifoss). The park lies on the west side of Vatnajökull - Europe's largest glacier. Skaftafell is the name of the hill that runs along one of the glacier fingers and between the mountains. There is a visitor center (open til 4pm) and campsite (open mid May) with full amenities and disability access.
Jökulsárgljúfur / Vatnajökull National Park
Bjarnabúð
North Sailing - Húsavík Whale Watching
Hverfjall
Hverfjall (also known as Hverfell) is a tephra cone or tuff ring volcano in northern Iceland, to the east of Mývatn. It erupted in 2500 BP in the southern part of the Krafla fissure swarm. The crater is approximately 1 km in diameter.Tephra has been carried from Hverfjall all over the Lake Myvatn area. A landslide apparently occurred in the south part of the crater during the eruption, which accounts for the disruption to the round shape of the mountain. During the Age of Settlement, lava flowed from Svortuborgir, at the southern end of Namafjall, around Hverfjall, which was nearly engulfed by the lava. At the same time an eruption occurred in the slopes above the valley of Hlidardalur.The rim of the crater is only accessible by two paths, from the northwest and south. It is strictly forbidden to use other routes in ascent or descent.
Grjotagja
Grjótagjá is a small lava cave near lake Mývatn in Iceland. It has a thermal spring inside. In early 18th century the outlaw Jón Markússon lived there and used the cave for bathing. Until the 1970s Grjótagjá was a popular bathing site. But during the eruptions from 1975 to 1984 the temperature of the water rose to more than 50 °C (122 °F), though the temperature is slowly decreasing and has fallen below 50 °C again. The nearby lava cave of Stóragjá is being used as an alternative bathing site. Grjótagjá was used as a location for filming the fifth episode of the third season of Game of Thrones, called "Kissed by Fire".
Dimmuborgir
Dimmuborgir (dimmu "dark", borgir "cities" or "forts", "castles"); pronounced [ˈd̥ɪmːʏˌb̥ɔrg̊ɪr̥]) is a large area of unusually shaped lava fields east of Mývatn in Iceland. The Dimmuborgir area is composed of various volcanic caves and rock formations, reminiscent of an ancient collapsed citadel (hence the name). The dramatic structures are one of Iceland's most popular natural tourist attractions.
Hofdi
Höfði is a house in Reykjavík, Iceland, best known as the location for the 1986 Reykjavík Summit meeting of presidents Ronald Reagan of the United States and Mikhail Gorbachev of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. That effectively was a step to the end of the Cold War. Within the building, the flags of the United States and the Soviet Union are cross-hung to commemorate the meeting. The house was built in 1909 and is located at Félagstún. It was initially built for the French consul Jean-Paul Brillouin in Iceland, and was the exclusive residence of poet and businessman Einar Benediktsson (1864-1940) for many years. From 1925 to 1937 painter Louisa Matthíasdóttir's family owned the house and resided there.In the 1940s and 1950s, it was home to the British Embassy in Reykjavík. The city of Reykjavík purchased the house in 1958, restored it to its former glory. From then on it has been used for formal receptions and festive occasions. On 25 September 2009, on the building's 100th birthday, Höfði was damaged in a fire. All irreplaceable artifacts were saved. In 2015, Einar Benediktsson's statue, by Ásmundur Sveinsson, was moved to a spot near Höfði house.
Laxá Hótel
Herðubreið
Herðubreið (Icelandic pronunciation: ​[ˈhɛrðʏpreiθ], broad-shouldered) is a tuya in north-east Iceland. It is situated in the Highlands of Iceland at the east side of the Ódáðahraun desert and close to Askja volcano. The desert is a large lava field originating from eruptions of Trölladyngja and other shield volcanoes in the area. Herðubreið was formed beneath the icesheet that covered Iceland during the last glacial period.
Askja
Askja ([ˈascja] (listen)) is a caldera situated in a remote part of the central highlands of Iceland. The name Askja refers to a complex of nested calderas within the surrounding Dyngjufjöll mountains, which rise to 1,510 m (4,954 ft), askja meaning box or caldera in Icelandic
Goðafoss
The Goðafoss (Icelandic: "waterfall of the gods" or "waterfall of the goði") is a waterfall in Iceland. It is located in the Bárðardalur district of Northeastern Region at the beginning of the Sprengisandur highland road. The water of the river Skjálfandafljót falls from a height of 12 metres over a width of 30 metres. The river has its origin deep in the Icelandic highland and runs from the highland through the Bárðardalur valley, from Sprengisandur in the Highlands. In the year 999 or 1000 the lawspeaker Þorgeir Ljósvetningagoði made Christianity the official religion of Iceland. According to a modern myth, it is said that upon returning from the Alþingi, Þorgeir threw his statues of the Norse gods into the waterfall. The story of Þorgeir's role in the adoption of Christianity in Iceland is preserved in Ari Þorgilsson's Íslendingabók. "Íslendingabók", however, makes no mention of Þorgeir throwing his idols into Goðafoss. A window in Akureyrarkirkja, the Cathedral of Akureyri, illustrates this story. MS Goðafoss, an Icelandic ship named after the waterfall, used to transport both freight and passengers. It was sunk by a German U-Boat in World War II, resulting in great loss of life.
ACCO Accommodation Akureyri reception
Kjalvegur
Kjalvegur is a highland road in Iceland, crossing Kjölur from north to south.
Kerlingarfjöll
Kerlingarfjöll is a 1,477 m (4,846 ft) tall mountain range in Iceland situated in the Highlands of Iceland near the Kjölur highland road. They are part of a large tuya volcano system of 100 km2 (39 sq mi). The volcanic origin of these mountains is evidenced by the numerous hot springs and rivulets in the area, as well as red volcanic rhyolite stone of which the mountains are composed. Minerals that have emerged from the hot springs also color the ground yellow, red and green. The area was known formerly for its summer ski resort, but this was dismantled in 2000. Since 2000, Kerlingarfjöll has been operated as a highland resort, offering accommodation and food services to guests in the area.It was on March 17 in 2017 that the Iceland Monitor wrote that Kerlingarfjöll Mountains and geothermal area were being turned into a nature reserve. Although parts of the place already had protection, after made into reserve, all the whole 367 square kilometres are to be under the protection of the state of Iceland. Earlier, there had been thoughts of using the 140 degree Celsius hot springs as a geothermal power plant. It had already been popular of course with hiking and the tourists
Geysir
Geysir (The Great Geysir) is a geyser in southwestern Iceland. The name Geysir itself is derived from the Icelandic verb geysa ("to gush") the verb from Old Norse. Geysir lies in the Haukadalur valley on the slopes of Laugarfjall hill, which is also the home to Strokkur geyser. Eruptions at Geysir can hurl boiling water up to 70 metres (230 ft) in the air. However, eruptions may be infrequent, and have in the past stopped altogether for years at a time. The nearby geyser Strokkur erupts much more frequently than Geysir, erupting to heights of up to 30 metres (98 ft) every few minutes. Strokkur's activity has also been affected by earthquakes, although to a lesser extent than the Great Geysir. Due to its eruption frequency, online photos and videos of Strokkur are regularly mislabelled as depicting Geysir. There are around thirty much smaller geysers and hot pools in the area, including one called Litli Geysir ('Little Geysir'). Descriptions of the Great Geysir and Strokkur have been given in many travel guides to Iceland published from the 18th century onwards. Together with Þingvellir and the Gullfoss waterfall, they are part of the Golden Circle that make up the most famous tourist route in the country.
Golden Circle Apartments
Thingvellir National Park
Þingvellir (Icelandic: [ˈθiŋkˌvɛtlɪr̥] (listen)), anglicised as Thingvellir, is a national park in the municipality of Bláskógabyggð in southwestern Iceland, about 40 km northeast of Iceland's capital, Reykjavík. Þingvellir is a site of historical, cultural, and geological significance, and is one of the most popular tourist destinations in Iceland. The park lies in a rift valley that marks the crest of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and the boundary between the North American and Eurasian tectonic plates. To its south lies Þingvallavatn, the largest natural lake in Iceland.Þingvellir is associated with the Althing, the national parliament of Iceland, which was established at the site in 930 AD. Sessions were held at the location until 1798.Þingvellir National Park (þjóðgarðurinn á Þingvöllum) was founded in 1930, marking the 1000th anniversary of the Althing. The park was later expanded to protect the diverse and natural phenomena in the surrounding area, and was designated as a World Heritage Site in 2004.
Kaldidalur
The Kaldidalsvegur is the shortest of the highland tracks traversing the Highlands of Iceland, therefore the nickname "highlands for beginners". Its name derives from the valley it crosses: kaldidalur means "cold dale/valley". Sometimes the Kaldidalsvegur is referred to as simply "the Kaldidalur". The route begins a bit to the north of Þingvellir and to the west of the volcano Skjaldbreiður, which really comes up to its name (meaning broad shield). The track continues between the glaciers Þórisjökull and Ok and leads up to the north. To the east of Reykholt it comes near the Reykholtsdalur to Húsafell. Then it continues up to Hvammstangi at the Miðfjörður. Signed as route 550 (formerly F550), the track is 40 kilometers long, and has no unbridged river crossings. (The Kaldidalsvegur is not an F road, and a four-wheel-drive vehicle is not legally required to traverse it, however many car rental companies forbid the use of their two-wheel-drive vehicles on this interior route.) The other well known highland routes are Kjölur and Sprengisandur.
Barnafossar
Barnafoss is also known as Bjarnafoss, which was its previous name. Barnafoss is near Hraunfossar which burst out of Hallmundarhraun which is a great lava plain. Barnafoss is a waterfall in Western Iceland, about 100 kilometres (62 mi) from Reykjavík. Barnafoss is on the river Hvítá in Borgarfjörður. Hraunfossar flows out of a lava field into Hvítá near Barnafoss, creating a stunning scenery.
Reykholt
Reykholt may refer to the following places in Iceland: Reykholt, Southern Iceland, village on the Golden Circle Reykholt, Western Iceland, home of Snorri Sturluson
Deildartunguhver
Deildartunguhver is a hot spring in Reykholtsdalur, Iceland. It is characterized by a very high flow rate for a hot spring (180 liters/second) and water emerges at 97 °C. It is the highest-flow hot spring in Europe.Some of the water is used for heating, being piped 34 kilometers to Borgarnes and 64 kilometers to Akranes. A fern called Struthiopteris fallax, grows in Deildartunguhver. This fern is the only endemic fern in Iceland, and it does not grow anywhere else in the world.
Krauma
Hot springs
Arnarstapi Hotel
Arnarstapi
Arnarstapi or Stapi is a small fishing village at the foot of Mt. Stapafell between Hellnar village and Breiðavík farms on the southern side of Snæfellsnes, Iceland. Placenames in the vicinity of Arnarstapi and nearby Hellnar village are inspired by Bárðar saga Snæfellsáss, an Icelandic saga relating the story of Bárður, a half human and half ogre. Arnarstapi was a natural site for landings and harbor for small vessels, and therefore ideal for a shipping port. In the olden days, Arnarstapi was thus from very early on, a busy fishing port and commercial centre servicing the West coast area under the Danish crown and a merchant monopoly of Denmark was in effect from 1565. From then on and through the 17th and 18th century, agents of the Danish crown had custodial power over Arnarstapi and commercial rights by royal appointment over nearby lands, formerly owned by Helgafell monastery and monopoly of all trade in the area. Several old houses from that time, each with its own unique history, can be seen at Arnarstapi, the old Amtmannshús (The Danish Prefect's Residence (1774–1787) having a history of its own, it having been moved in 1849 to nearby Vogur á Mýrum, where it stayed until 1983, when it was moved back again to Arnarstapi in 1985 and declared a historical site in 1990. There resided amongst other notables, Danish Prefect Bjarni Thorsteinsson (1821–1849), whose son was renowned poet and writer Steingrímur Thorsteinsson. Today Arnarstapi is still a somewhat busy harbor during the summer months serving private fishing and recreational vessels as well with its maintained docks that were renewed in 2002. Being a popular destination of tourists in summer, Arnarstapi is today a thriving centre for local tourism activities where there is a variety of natural and culinary attractions as well and a cluster of second homes are located in and around the village. There is much beauty to be found in nearby attractions, and an old horse trail past Neðstavatn is now a popular hiking trail across the lava and along the beach between Arnarstapi and Hellnar. This walk is about one hour. The lava field is called Hellnahraun, and its coast where at its westernmost edge can be found the ancient small village of Hellnar is a natural preserve. Along the coast there are some unique rock formations to be seen. There the waves of the ocean play along with the sun and the daylight to produce a natural show of which the most spectacular can be experienced at the cliff Gatklettur, and the rifts Hundagjá, Miðgjá and Músagjá. Near Arnarstapi you will also find many other interesting natural wonders like Rauðfeldsgjá, Dritvík, Bjarnarfoss and Lóndrangar.
Hellnar
Hellnar (Icelandic pronunciation: ​[ˈhɛtl̥nar]) is an ancient fishing village, a cluster of old houses and buildings situated close to Arnarstapi on the westernmost part of the Snæfellsnes peninsula, Iceland. Although Hellnar village used to be a major port of call for fishing vessels and the largest and busiest centre of fishing and fishing vessels in Snæfellsnes, there were also a few farms in and around Hellnar village along with quite a few semi-permanent and short-stay living quarters for seamen and the migrating workforce. Hellnar village can in all probability trace its function as a major port of call back to the Middle Ages, and the oldest written source of it being describes as a fishing port dates back to 1560. In earlier times, Hellnar would have been in relatively large part fisheries-related farms and buildings, and in the national census of 1703, some 194 individuals were registered as being inhabitants of Hellnar. This same year the buildings and farms of Hellnar are listed as numbering 38 altogether, of which 7 farms are listed as agricultural farms, 11 as having fisheries and fisheries-related functions, and 20 as listed as being semi-permanent or short-stay lodgings for the migrating work force and displaced persons. On the beach some spectacular rock formations are to be seen, one of which is a protruding cliff called Valasnös, which reaches across the ocean front and into the sea. Tunneling into this cliff there is a cave known for colorful changes of lighting and shades that vary in tune with the natural light and the movements of the sea.
Snæfellsjökull National Park
Snæfellsjökull (Icelandic pronunciation: ​[ˈstn̥aiːfɛlsˌjœːkʏtl̥], snow-fell glacier) is a 700,000-year-old glacier-capped stratovolcano in western Iceland. It is situated on the most western part of the Snæfellsnes peninsula in Iceland. Sometimes it may be seen from the city of Reykjavík over Faxa Bay, at a distance of 120 km. The mountain is one of the most famous sites of Iceland, primarily due to the novel Journey to the Center of the Earth (1864) by Jules Verne, in which the protagonists find the entrance to a passage leading to the center of the earth on Snæfellsjökull. The mountain is included in the Snæfellsjökull National Park (Icelandic: Þjóðgarðurinn Snæfellsjökull).In August 2012 the summit was ice-free for the first time in recorded history.
Grundarfoss
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